How email marketing works.

In this article I’m going to show you how email marketing works.

And why you can grow your business fast and get to live your dream lifestyle.

It’s easier than you think.

And it only requires 20 minutes a day.

Before I reveal how email marketing works I have a question for you.

Did you know there are over 6 billion email accounts worldwide?

That means almost everyone has an email address.

This figure is predicted to reach 7.71 billion by the middle of 2022, which is a growth of more than 22%!


72% of people say that email is their favorite way of interacting with companies they do business with.

61% say they like to receive promotional emails weekly. And 28% want them even more frequently.MarketingSherpa


66% of consumers have bought online as a direct result of an email marketing message – Direct Marketing Association.

And that email marketing has a 44 – 1 return on investment.

For every $1 you invest you get $44 back.

How email marketing works.

Email marketing is unlike any other form of marketing.

It’s similar to direct mail, in that it’s more persuasive than a Facebook or Google ad campaign.

Behind the scenes of an email copywriter.

Over the years I’ve spent thousands of hours un-training myself.

I hate coming across as most witters do.

Most writers I know have a weird way of “talking.”

They use words like…

Analyse, balance, be conscious of, one does, one should, call to mind, organise, logical, comprehend, understand, relate to, come to mind, and so on.

Only one problem here.

None of these words “fit in a wheelbarrow.”

What do I mean?

If you can’t see it in your mind, it doesn’t fit in a wheelbarrow.

Try to make an image in your mind of the word “analyse.”

How about “comprehend, logical, understand or organise.”

Can’t do it. Can you?

If you want to be great at email writing you need an emotional thesaurus.

Words like…

  • White hot.
  • Wounded duck.
  • Forced.
  • Vicious.
  • Front-line trenches.
  • Street-tough.
  • Tickle.
  • Slaughter.
  • Abandon.
  • Slash.
  • Virus.
  • Shelter.
  • Bloody.

And so on.

Mental movies.

Can you feel the DRAMA in each of those words above?

It’s as if each word tells its own unique story.

They are immediate.

Visceral.

Impactful.

Full of drama.

Dramatic Moments.

I know this is about as blunt as a foot in the face, but you’ve got to MOVE people with your words.

Perfect Language.

Let’s take a moment to look at lyrics of songs that have stood the test of time.

The ones that still move you even after the 100th listen.

Annie’s Song.

You fill up my senses, like a night in a forest.

Like the mountains in springtime,

like a walk in the rain.

Like a storm in the desert,

like a sleepy blue ocean.

You fill up my senses, come fill me again.

The emotional delivery business.

Every sentence is soaked in feeling words.

Visual.

“Like a night in a forest.”

Auditory.

“Like a storm in the desert,”

Kinaesthetic.

“Like a walk in the rain.”

He “carved” those words with the same precision as Michelangelo carved David from marble.

Only two types of words.

Don’t tell me you thought English was complicated.

It’s not.

I’ll show you how simple it is.

Ready?

First rule.

Each word must convey a picture in the mind of your reader.

Second rule.

The only exception to the first rule is the second rule.

I’ll come back to that in a moment or three.

As H. Phelps Gates puts it.

There is strength and force in short words.

Words that blast and boom.

Throb and thump.

Clank and chime.

Hiss and buzz and zoom.

There is grace and charm in a short word.

Words like lull and hush and purr.

There are short, lush words like…

Dank, muck and dench.

And short dry ones like…

Crisp, parch and husk.

There are words that work hard at their job that pry and push, slash and hack, cut and clip, chip and saw.

Words that tease the taste.

Make glad the eye.

Whet the nose.

And please the ear.

There’s nip, twang, bite and tang.

There’s sweet, sour, tart or dry as they need be.

There are words you can hear like the swish of silk.

Soft words with a feel of swan’s down.

Words with a smell like musk.

Smoke, cheese, mint and rose.

All of them good sales tools.

Can you see the images behind these words?

Even if that image is a smell or a touch?

Good because now you get to discover the second rule.

If it’s not a picture word, then it has to be a connector word.

These second types of words connect one picture word to another.

Words like,

The, and, there’s, there are, with, a, that. at, like, is, in, etc.

Quick question.

Have you ever read a “Jack Reacher” novel?

If you haven’t then you’re in for a real treat.

If you have then you understand the power of fiction to help you understand how email marketing works.

Here’s a short excerpt…

Maximum acceleration.

Amos said, “What?”

“Chase him.” Reacher Said, “Go. go go.”

She glanced over her shoulder and stamped on the gas and took off in pursuit.

She said, “What just happened?”

“You scared him,” Reacher said, Your red lights were still on.

Like you were pulling him over.

“He was stationary.”

“Maybe he thought you were busting him.”

“Why would I? was he on a hydrant?”

“Maybe he’s got weed in the car. Or secret documents. Or something.

Maybe he thinks you’re an agent of deep state suppression.

We’re dealing with an old guy here with a ponytail here.”

They followed him a hundred yards behind, then eighty, then fifty, then twenty.

The Subaru was doing its valiant best, but it was no match for the modern day police vehicle. With lights and a siren.

Then up ahead the Subaru turned right.

It was lost to sight for ten or twelve agonizing seconds, but they turned after it, and saw it turning again, at the end of the block.

Lee Childs

Now see if you can pick out the picture words and connector words.

She glanced over her shoulder and stamped on the gas and took off in pursuit.

We’re dealing with an old guy here with a ponytail here.

They followed him a hundred yards behind, then eighty, then fifty, then twenty.

Then up ahead the Subaru turned right.

It was lost to sight for ten or twelve agonizing seconds, but they turned after it, and saw it turning again, at the end of the block.

You’ve just had one of the best short courses you’ve ever had in your life.

One which will make you a MUCH better writer.

Now, I wouldn’t normally give this valuable information away for free.

But because I know somewhere in the near future, I know you’ll recommend this post to help a dear friend of yours become a better, more persuasive writer.

I’ll leave you with this thought.

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